A Professional Opinion

Matthias Kramer

The first time I met Dr. Buttons was on the way home from the hospital, with the latest flavor of Frappuccino balanced precariously in my bicycle's basket. He was lying sprawled out, belly up, on the sidewalk in front of the neighborhood park. Screeching to a halt, narrowly catching my Frappuccino before it flew whipped-cream first into the void, I considered my options. The doctor didn’t seem injured. In fact, he appeared to be enjoying his time there on the sunbaked cement more than any number of clams in a proverbial high-tide. His expression made him seem wiser than old stones. Inside of me, an invoiceable question crystallized.

“Excuse me,” I said, pitching my voice as I did while speaking to my father when I visited him. A voice halfway between the brusque entreaty of a librarian’s shush and a lover’s delicate early-morning coo.

The doctor pretended not to hear me, though I knew he knew I was there. Even though his eyes were closed and his breathing regular, the slight twitching of his chin hairs assured me he was awake. Between his narrowly slit eyelids, I took note of a slight glint of green revealed by the sunlight reflected off the tsukemen shop’s storefront window. The doctor was in.

Deciding not to cause any further trouble for the doctor, I rolled my bike around him and carried on my way. As I rode home, slower than normal, I pondered that newly formed question. By the time I got home, the whipped-cream had melted in the summer sun. The doctor had made an impression on me, and I longed for our next chance encounter.

Next week, I got my wish, catching Dr. Buttons again on my way home from the hospital. I recognized his lustrous black fur coat and lucent eyes immediately, even from across the street. With only a slight regard for personal safety, I cut through the intersection and hopped off my bike. Dr. Buttons sat on a waist-high brick wall surrounding the neighborhood park, carefully licking the space between his stretched-out fingers.

“Excuse me,” I again said in that same voice reserved for hospital bedsides.

Dr. Buttons regarded me with a cool emerald glance.

“You must be hot, wearing that coat and all.” I tried to make conversation, thinking this might be my only chance to ask my question. “I wonder if you’ve got anything else to wear.”

The doctor surrendered to a tremendous yawn. He stood up from his perch and trotted off towards the swing set. I followed a few paces behind. He didn’t seem to be trying to escape, more so acting as a sort of guide. We passed the swings and ended up in a small shady spot nestled beneath a copse of flowerless sakura trees beside a koi pond. The doctor hopped onto a stone bench and made room for me to sit next to him. I obliged.

“I wonder if I could ask your opinion on something.”

The doctor made no move to give affirmation or negation to my inquiry. Instead, he closed his eyes and reopened them.

“You see, my father is, well…” I tried to consider how to phrase it, but words failed me.

Dr. Buttons placed his hand on my thigh. The pads of his hands felt cool and smooth like river stones. His fingernails were sharp, but he took care not to prick me with them. Normally, when someone made a move on me like this—especially in public—I would shrink away and close off completely. The doctor, however, made an entirely different impression on me.

“I don’t know who else to ask. None of the other doctors would be able to help.”

My father’s hospital bed appeared before my eyes with its paper-thin, ghost-white sheet, its plastic control panel for summoning the nurses or self-medicating, the stainless-steel IV stand with its tangle of emotionless tubes. I could hear the intermittent beeping signature of my father’s continued existence. He was teetering somewhere halfway in and halfway out, like a child balancing on the threshold of her parents’ bedroom, hands on the doorframe for support. My mother sat in a fake-leather chair, turquoise and with the faint smell of vomit cloying the air around it. The setting sun illumined her profile. She never could find a way to live without being by his side, even considering all that had happened with him and us, even now with his liver half gone.

“What he did, it’s not going to disappear. I know that,” I said to Dr. Buttons. My next words cut short in that in-between space dividing thought and speech. “But life will have to be different, right?” I somehow concluded my question. “You know, after he’s dead…”

The doctor remained motionless, hand pressed on my thigh, tail swaying in the breeze. Then he yawned again, and tiny white fangs appeared between his lips. With that, he hopped off and disappeared into the brush. I sat on the bench, feeling inexplicably satisfied, and understanding now that no doctor could give any real answer to my question, should even that doctor be a cat.














専門家の意見

Matthias Kramer










私が初めてボタンズ先生と出会ったのは病院の帰り道に、自転車のかごに入れて不安定な新作のフラペチーノのバランスを取っている時のことだった。彼は近所の公園前の歩道で大の字に寝そべっていた。私はかろうじてフラペチーノのホイップクリームが飛び出る前にキャッチし、これからどうしようか考えた。先生にケガはなさそうだった。それどころか、満潮にどんないる貝よりも、先生は太陽に熱せされたセメントの上で日光浴を満喫してそうだった。彼の表情は旧石よりも博識のように思った。私の心で、言葉に言い表せない質問が明確になった。

「すみません」私の声は父の元を訪ね、話しかける時のようだった。その声は司書の「静かに!」という無愛想な注意の声と、早朝恋人にかける甘い囁きとの間ぐらいのものだった。

先生が私の存在に気付いていると分かっていたが、彼は聞こえないふりをした。彼は眼を閉じて息をしているにも関わらず、わずかにピクピクしている顎の毛が目覚めていることを確信させた。私は彼の狭く細長い瞼の間に、つけ麺屋の店先の窓に反射した日光によって現れた弱い緑の閃光を目にした。彼がそこにいたのだ。

これ以上先生のじゃまをしないと決めた。彼を避けて自転車を押し、家に向かって進んだ。いつもよりゆっくり帰って乗りながら、新しく生まれた疑問を考えた。家に着くごろには夏の日差しでホイップクリームが溶けてしまっていた。彼のことが気になり、また偶然会えるのを待ち望んだ。

翌週、その願いが実現した。病院からの帰り道にまた彼の姿を目にしたのだ。たとえ道の反対側からでも彼の艶やかな黒色の上着や輝く目を瞬時に捉えることが出来た。少しばかりの身の安全を確保して交差点を突き進み、自転車を乗り捨てた。ボタンズ先生は近所の公園に囲まれた腰ほどの高さのレンガ塀に座り、パッと広げた指と指の間を入念に舐めていた。

もう一回「すみません…」と言ってみた。その声は病院の枕元に取っておいたものと同じだった。

彼は冷たいエメラルド色の眼差しをこちらに向けた。

「暑くないの、コートなんて着て…。」私はこれが質問できる唯一のチャンスかもしれないと考えながら、話をしようとした。「他に服、持ってないのかな。」

彼は堪えきれず大きな欠伸をした。彼は塀から飛び降りブランコに向かって行った。私は少し距離を空けて後ろを付いて行った。彼に逃げようとする様子はなく、それどころか案内してくれているようであった。私たちはブランコを通り過ぎ、花が咲いていない雑木林の下にある小さな木陰へとたどり着いた。鯉がいる池のそばには桜の木があった。先生は石のベンチに飛び乗り、となりに座れるように場所を空けてくれ、私はそれに応えた。

「ちょっと聞いてもいい?」

先生は私の質問に対して肯定も否定もせず、ただ目を閉じ、また開いた。

「あのね、私のお父さんって…。」口に出そうとしたが、言葉が見つからなかった。

彼は私の腿に手をのせた。彼の手は川の石のようにひんやりとしていて滑らかだった。爪は鋭いものの、私を傷つけないように配慮してくれていた。普通は、特に人前で、誰かがその行為をすると、私が尻込みをして完全に縮こまってしまっていた。しかし、彼の場合は全く違った。

「誰に聞けばいいのか分からないし、あなたしか聞いてくれる人がいないの。」

父の病院のベッドが、紙のように薄い真っ白なシーツや、ナースを呼んだり薬を処方するための操作盤や、冷たいステンレス製のチューブが絡まった点滴スタンドと共に私の目の前に現れた。父が生き続けているというサインである断続的なビープ音が聞こえた。父はまるで子供が両親の寝室前のとば口のところでフレームに手を貸し躊躇するように半分こちらで、半分あちらの世界を行き来していた。母はターコイズ色で微かに吐瀉物の臭いが蔓延する人工皮革の椅子に座った。夕日が彼女の横顔を照らし出した。彼女は夫や私たちに起こってきたすべて、彼の肝臓が半分になってしまった今でも、決してそばを離れようとはしなかった。

「お父さんの行為はどこにも行かない、そんなことは分かってる。」私は続けた。だが、口に出そうとしたところで思い留まった。「でも、生活は違にならなきゃ、違う?」どうにか締めくくった。「お父さんが死んじゃった後で…。」

先生はやはり微動せずに、私の腿を押したまま、尻尾がゆらゆらとそよ風に揺れた。その後彼はまた欠伸をして、白く小さい犬歯が口元に現れた。そしてそのまま飛び降りて雑木林へと消えて行った。私はベンチに腰掛け、なぜかほっとした。今、やっと分かった。私の質問に対する本当の答えなんて先生は教えてはくれない。たとえその先生がネコだったとしても。